Easter traditions

Easter traditions

Here are some Easter traditions you may not know about…

  • Egyptians and Persians used to dye eggs in spring colours and give them to friends as a symbol of renewed life.
  • In Germany, eggs are dyed green on Maundy Thursday, while in Greece the traditional colour is red to represent Christ's blood.
  • Easter bonnets are a throw-back to the days when people denied themselves the pleasure of wearing finery for the duration of Lent. Churchgoers would wear some bright new piece of clothing - a sign of new life.
  • Egg rolling is supposed to symbolise the stone being rolled away from the tomb where Jesus was laid.
  • The tallest Easter egg was recorded in South Africa in 1996. It was 7.65 metres (25 feet) tall and weighed 4,068 kilos.
  • The largest Easter egg hunt took place in Australia in 1999 when 150,000 chocolate eggs were hidden by troops and found by 3,000 children.
  • About 80 million Easter eggs were eaten in the UK last year, as well as almost 500 million cream eggs.
  • The first example of buns being baked to mark the beginning of spring was seen in ancient cultures such as the Assyrians, Babylonians and Egyptians.
  • Buns were marked with a curved shape representing the horns of an ox, the animal associated with the moon, and were offered to the goddess connected with fertility and renewal.
  • It is thought that the Greek for ox, «boun», may have given us our word «bun».
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